Challenges and Opportunities Abound for Nonprofit Administrators

Over the past decade, corporate executives have entered the nonprofit management world in growing numbers. Nonprofit work often attracts those who are looking to use their leadership, management, and marketing skills in a more innovative way. Many have decided that they would like to use their business skills in a charitable environment to plan, launch, and operate organizations that have strong ties to the community and are backed by those who have a passion for causes.
Nonprofit employees usually enjoy:

  • Creating Results Using Few Resources. Whether they require more money, more time, or more people, nonprofit managers find that what they need to make their organization successful is in short supply. Benita, a nonprofit manager of a women’s health organization in an inner city, says, “I always have to make more with less. With so much of my energy spent making sure that our fundraising opportunities are bringing in enough money for the next few months, I have to figure out new ways to get results. It’s frustrating, but I love that fact that I’m given free rein to try my ideas, as long as they translate to fundraising success and positive press for the Institute.”
  • Working on Challenging Projects—Every Day. Nonprofit work for employees is rarely divided up by skill. Instead, it’s a hodgepodge of activity. A typical day for a nonprofit executive could be meeting with a corporation’s board of directors, followed up with a discussion about updating the nonprofit’s social media campaign, with a quick networking luncheon squeezed into the middle of the day. The rest of the day could involve looking at the organization’s financials, drafting a case study or opinion piece, and managing human resources issues.
  • Developing New Ideas That Improve the World. It’s a lofty goal, yes, but nonprofit managers and administrators are passionate about making the world a better place. They place a high value on learning, appreciate compassionate acts that touch many different people and places, and feel so strongly about society’s progression that they often leave high-paying corporate jobs to work in a nonprofit organization and concentrate on a mission.

As the economy continues to improve, nonprofit organizations are expected to increase their staff size to handle larger and more varied operations. Although many tools are available to help nonprofit managers compete with for-profit entities, an experienced administrator is needed to direct the organization’s mission, manage projects, and bring in much-needed investments.

Lindenwood University Online offers a 37-credit master’s degree in Nonprofit Administration. This fully accredited program is taught by Lindenwood University instructors and, as an online graduate program, can be completed on your own time. Call or contact Lindenwood University today to learn more.